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Fresh Baby Artichokes

This quintessential Spring dish is served in Sicily as a "minestra", which means a thick soup. Though not technically a soup at all, there is quite a bit of broth at the bottom of the skillet when the dish is done. In my hometown, my family would add small chunks of toasted peasant bread to the mix and eat it with a spoon. The preparation is adaptable, however. If you prefer to serve it as a side for roast lamb, ham or veal, you can simply increase the heat during the last minute or two of cooking to evaporate the juices. You can also leave all the juice intact and pour it as a sauce over cooked pasta or Basmati rice. What stays the same in all adaptations is the "green" flavor of Spring in every bite. read more...
Yellow Squash & Green Zucchini

Here is an easy baked zucchini dish that is the height of simplicity. I make it often at home because it requires little effort and because my family love it. This dish has a great cheesy, soft consistency perfectly contrasted with a nicely browned crisp top layer. read more...
Tuscan Kale

The organic Tuscan kale we get from California is especially delicious and chewy. The texture is so sturdy and the flavor so meaty, that the growers refer to this kale as "succulent". You'll need to parboil the leaves and stem first before you begin braising or sautéing. A heaping bowl of sautéed Tuscan kale served with good crusty bread and a few slices of our rustic Pecorino Toscano is a satisfying weeknight supper. Treat yourself to a glass of Vernaccia di San Gimignano or a light, refreshing Galestro. Their dry, flowery flavors and good body complement the bitter greens. read more...
Pearl Onions

Small onions, cooked until burnished or meltingly soft, are the perfect accompaniment to a handsome roast of beef, veal, turkey or pork. They are full of flavor, not too filling, and look beautiful on the plate. read more...
Emmenthaler Cheese

Here is another potato creation from my kitchen. I wanted a potato "form" to accompany roasted meats that could soak up juices. This is my simple, plain "brioche" of potato. You simply mix all ingredients, shape the paste into popover-like domes and bake. The mix is surprisingly easy to work with and pulls into shape quite nicely. The light, plain "brioche" are perfect for sopping up flavorful juices and can also be stuffed with peas or chopped salami if you want something more substantial. read more...
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